Green-Lighting Employee Monitoring and When to Stop

Employee surveillance has been the topic of heated debates about privacy and legalities in the workplace for a long time. In Australia, security agencies and educational institutes need monitoring systems such as a guard tour system to oversee employee efficiency and task compliance. Having a reliable system to work with like a guard tour system is a huge helping hand to both workers and employers. However, there are undefined gaps in employee surveillance that need to be filled by companies and employees to ensure that what they’re doing is indeed beneficial.

Legal vs Illegal Spying

One of the first few questions about monitoring employees is: Is it legal? Yes, it is. There are no laws in the Australian Constitution that hinder employees from screening their employees’ activities and actions in the workplace. However, monitoring employees is under the Privacy Act, so it’s mandatory to inform employees that they’re being monitored. Employees should be notified beforehand through notification papers.

The Workplace Surveillance Act of 2005 also ensures that companies that are monitoring employees through tracking and video or computer surveillance should be regulated. They need to comply with the rules of both discreet and overt surveillance. Few of them are making sure that employees understand the mechanics of being monitored such as security policies, forbidden activities, and the instances when the company should disclose email content. For example, if an institute has a guard tour system, it is the institution’s primary responsibility to inform and train the security officials who are required to log their activities.

When is employee surveillance illegal or inefficient? Monitoring employees is only bad or illegal if:

  • The company uses a spyware that has keystrokes tracking function. Keystrokes tracking can figure out passwords, therefore allowing the spy to access sensitive employee information such as religious belief, health concerns, and political views. Such information is protected by the law.
  • The employee is completely oblivious that they are being monitored discreetly
  • The company fails to disclose monitoring policies early on. It is also inefficient on their part as it will take more time and effort again to educate employees about surveillance.
  • To unproductive employees, monitoring could wrongfully magnify their idle acts such as logging on to social media and having long coffee breaks.

The good in snooping

There are a lot of benefits in employee surveillance. Sometimes, they are often overlooked because of ethical concerns. Even with productive employees, sometimes knowing that you’re being monitored can make you feel awkward. Nonetheless, here are the benefits of employee monitoring:

  • Effectiveness – a monitoring system eliminates arduous activities such as doing paperwork.
  • Real time tracking – It ensures employees’ productivity and records information about site attendance.
  • Protection for employees – A good example of showing that you care about your employees is through a guard tour system. The guard tour system Australia sells today helps security guards deliver their task on time while being recorded and ensured that they’re in the right location.
  • Data analysis – A feature of guard tour systems that helps companies shape their policies and regulations. Areas that have missed time intervals and get a lot of alerts can be a subject for changing patrolling policies that will help in protecting other employees. The best guard tour system today is multifunctional—it can record detailed incident report in organized sheets and has custom alerts in case of missed time interval or they forgot to do something. Buy guard tour system that’s reliable and easy-to-use for your employees.

Meeting Halfway

Effective implementation of monitoring policies can be possible if employers are loyal to the rules and if employees are willing to collaborate. In order to meet halfway and mutually benefit each other, each of the parties must be willing to compromise and think of the bigger picture.